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Recovery Act


 Recovery.gov logoOJP's Information Related to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

Byrne Competitive Grant Program
Read the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Byrne Competitive Program: Final Report, July 2009–December 2012

Combating Criminal Narcotics Activity
Read the Program Performance Update: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Combating Criminal Narcotics Activity Stemming from the Southern Border of the United States (CCNA) Program, October 2010–September 2011

FY 2009 Recovery Act Grant Awards:

Recovery Act: Assistance to Rural Law Enforcement to Combat Crime and Drugs
(Read individual project descriptions)

Recovery Act: Correctional Facilities on Tribal Lands Program
(Read individual project descriptions)

Recovery Act: Edward Byrne Memorial Competitive Grant Program
(Read individual project descriptions)

Recovery Act: Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program (Local) (see page 17)

Recovery Act: Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program (State) (see page 141)

Recovery Act: State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Program: Combating Criminal Narcotics Activity Stemming from the Southern Border of the United States
(Read individual project descriptions)

DOJ Guidance:
Calculating Jobs Data

DOJ Recovery Act Guidance Webinar
The Office of Justice Programs (OJP) in cooperation with the Office on Violence against Women (OVW) and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) hosted a webinar on September 10, 2009, on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) Section 1512 reporting requirements. The webinar provided supplemental information to the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) existing guidance on recipient reporting and the central reporting solution, www.FederalReporting.gov. The webinar is available at: www.ojp.gov/recovery/rawebinar.htm.

OMB Reporting Guidance
On June 22, 2009, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued "Implementing Guidance for the Reports on Use of Funds Pursuant to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009." The Guidance consists of a 39 page paper of questions and answers and two supplements. The first supplement is a list of programs subject to recipient reporting. The Department of Justice (DOJ) is working with OMB to fix the incorrect DOJ program listings. The second supplement is the recipient reporting data model v 2.0.1. The three documents are linked below. OMB requested that if you have any questions about the requirements contained in the guidance, please send them to recovery@omb.eop.gov.

OMB Reporting Guidance: Webinar Training Materials
During the week of July 20, 2009, OMB hosted a 7-part series of webinars on the ARRA reporting responsibilities of recipients and federal agencies. Recipients of ARRA funding will be required to submit financial and program performance information beginning October 1, 2009. The training included an in-depth discussion of the new FederalReporting.gov web site that became accessible for registration beginning August 17, 2009.

We encourage all Recovery Act funding recipients to become familiar with the central reporting solution, FederalReporting.gov, and the dozens of data elements that prime recipients and sub-recipients will be required to report quarterly starting October 1st.

Overview of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act)

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was signed into law by President Obama on February 17, 2009. It is an unprecedented effort to jumpstart our economy, create or save millions of jobs, and put a down payment on addressing long-neglected challenges so our country can thrive in the 21st century. The Act is an extraordinary response to a crisis unlike any since the Great Depression, and includes measures to modernize our nation’s infrastructure, enhance energy independence, expand educational opportunities, preserve and improve affordable health care, provide tax relief, and protect those in greatest need.

Read the Office of Justice Programs' Recovery Act Fact Sheet

General Recovery Act Frequently Asked Questions

Implementing the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act)

The Recovery Act will inject $787 billion into the economy, providing jobs and much needed resources for states and local communities. Among these resources is more than $4 billion for state and local law enforcement and other criminal and juvenile justice activities. The Office of Justice Programs (OJP) which provides federal leadership in developing the nation's capacity to prevent and control crime, administering justice, and assisting victims, will administer $2.76 billion of this funding.

Payments to State Grantees for Administrative Costs of Recovery Act Activities

For more information, go to www.whitehouse.gov/omb/assets/memoranda_fy2009/m09-18.pdf.

Assistance Available through the Recovery Act and Administered by OJP:

  • The Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program
    BJA grant funding available: $1.989 billion

    Recovery Act: Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Formula Program: State Solicitation
    Recovery Act:Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Formula Program: Local Solicitation
    State and Local Allocation List
    Frequently Asked Questions

    The JAG Program, administered by OJP’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, allows states and local governments to support a broad range of activities to prevent and control crime and improve the criminal justice system. The procedure for allocating JAG grants is based on a formula of population and violent crime statistics, in combination with a minimum allocation to ensure that each state and territory receives an appropriate share of funding. Sixty percent of the allocation is awarded to the state and 40 percent is set aside for units of local governments.

    Funding that is awarded directly to the state governments, will be administered by a State Administering Agency (SAA) which will then set priorities and allocate funds within that state. Additional information about SAAs can be found at www.ojp.gov/saa/index.htm.

    Units of local government appearing on the FY 2009 Recovery Act Units of Local Government List, established by OJP’s Bureau of Justice Statistics, will also be eligible to apply for JAG funds. A listing of eligible units of local government is available at www.bja.gov/Topic.aspx?Topic_ID=8.

  • Questions? E-mail JAGRecovery@usdoj.gov.

    National Institute of Justice funding: $10 million
    The National Institute of Justice, through a limited competition among highly-rated projects, will fund the development and demonstration of tools and technologies that support the goals of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the purposes of the Byrne Justice Assistance Grant Program. The projects under consideration are projected to spur technological advances that the law enforcement community desperately needs to increase the economic efficiency and effectiveness of law enforcement activities. Project areas will address, among other law enforcement technology requirements and priorities, officer safety, public safety, communications (including interoperable communications) and decision-making, information sharing, electronic crime, less lethal devices, and concealed weapons detection. These projects, both through their implementation and impact, are also targeted to help preserve and create high quality jobs—both within the law enforcement community and within industries that provide tools and technologies for the law enforcement community. Up to $10 million is available to fund multiple projects.

    Bureau of Justice Statistics funding: $1 million
    Recovery Act: Tribal Crime Data Collection, Analysis and Estimation Project solicitation

    The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) will utilize Recovery Act funds for the "Tribal Crime Data Collection, Analysis, and Estimation Project," which is aimed at enhancing the utility of Tribal crime and justice data for use in the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program formula grant calculations. Currently, some tribal crime data are reported to the Department of Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs but it is not comprehensively utilized by the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting and, therefore, tribes are not able to access grant funds under the Byrne JAG Formula Grant Program. As a result of this project, qualifying tribes will be able to utilize formula grant funds for technical assistance, training, hiring personnel, equipment, supplies, contractual support, information systems for criminal justice, and criminal justice-related research and evaluation activities that will improve or enhance programs in many areas including law enforcement, prosecution and court, prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, planning, evaluation, and technology. Tribal governments may also utilize the crime and justice data generated through this project to better compete for other federal grant program funds in the areas of public health and safety. Under this BJS project, the recipient of funds will coordinate with federal, state, local and tribal, governments as necessary to enhance the utility of tribal crime and justice data. The project will involve several activities including: an assessment of the availability and usefulness of crime and justice data for criminal offenses occurring on federally recognized tribal lands; development of short- and long-term plans for utilizing tribal crime and justice data in formula grant calculations; and implementation of data collection, verification, and analysis plans.

  • The Edward Byrne Competitive Grant Program
    BJA grant funding available: $125.25 million

    Recovery Act Awards

    Solicitation: Recovery Act: Edward Byrne Memorial Competitive Grant Program
    Frequently Asked Questions

  • Byrne Competitive Grants are similar to JAG grants and are focused on ensuring job growth and job retention. However, instead of providing grants based on a formula, BJA administers these funds based on a competitive application process. These grants help state and local communities improve the capacity of local justice systems and may be used for national efforts such as training and technical assistance. Applicants may be national, regional, state, or local public and private entities, including for-profit (commercial) and nonprofit organizations, faith-based and community organizations, institutions of higher education, tribal jurisdictions, and units of local government that support the functioning of the criminal justice system.

    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) grant funding available: $97.5 million
    OJJDP's FY 2009 Recovery Act Local Youth Mentoring Initiative solicitation
    OJJDP's FY 2009 Recovery Act National Youth Mentoring Programs solicitation

    National Institute of Justice (NIJ) grant funding available: $2.25 million
    Solicitation: FY 2010 Recovery Act: Evaluation of Recovery Act State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance
    Solicitation: FY 2009 Recovery Act: Research and Evaluation of Recovery Act State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance

    In FY 2009, NIJ used Byrne funds to support the "Recovery Act: Evaluation of Recovery Act State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance" solicitation. NIJ funded applications from two organizations: the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) and Kutztown University of Pennsylvania. Each project set out to promote the goals of the Recovery Act through evaluations to support programs that increase the capacity of state and local criminal justice systems in some of the areas identified in the Edward Byrne Memorial Competitive Grant Program.

    PERF received $549,878 for "Hiring of Civilian Staff in Policing: An Assessment of the 2009 Byrne Program." Category IV of the Byrne Competitive Program offers funding to state and local law enforcement agencies (LEAs) to hire civilians for functions such as crime and forensic analysis, planning and research, and communications. In addition to preserving and creating jobs, this funding can potentially make LEAs more effective by enabling them to redeploy more officers to the street, diversifying the skills of their workforce, and improving their efficiency and cost effectiveness. However, there has been little assessment of how civilianization affects LEAs, despite the fact that civilians now account for 30 percent of LEA personnel. PERF proposes to address this issue through a study of the Byrne program that will have important ramifications for police practice as well as crime and economic policy. The study will provide a national examination of civilians hired through this program and the impacts of those hires on LEAs and their communities. It will also yield new data on the hiring, retention, uses, and performance of civilians in policing.

    Kutztown University received $227,690 for "Police Human Resource Planning: A Replication & Extension." The proposal is in response to NIJ's announcement that it is interested in learning more about the impact of preserving and creating positions in the criminal justice workforce. The proposed study will employ a mix of methods to gather data about the current state of police human resource planning: (1) a national stratified random sample survey of law enforcement agencies will replicate a prior survey administered in 1979 as part of the national Manpower Planning Development Project; (2) a national random sample survey of criminal justice educators will be aimed at determining higher education's stance toward employment?focused criminal justice education; (3) a convenience sample survey of criminal justice students from five universities will explore the career orientations and dispositions of today's emerging workforce; and (4) in?depth case studies will be prepared on a purposive convenience sample of 10 law enforcement agencies.

    In FY 2010, NIJ used Byrne funds to provide $500,000 to Rutgers University for "Evaluation of NJ Probation Specialized Mental Health Caseload." The New Jersey Probation Service Division of the Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC) was awarded $5.4 million over 2 years to implement 30 specialty mental health probation officers (SMHPO) in 21 counties. Each of the SMHPOs supervises caseloads of approximately 25 probationers with mental illnesses (PMI). Rutgers proposes a rigorous, mixed methods evaluation of this direct service initiative funded under the Recovery Act: Edward Byrne Memorial Competitive Grant Program, Category II: Providing for Funding of Neighborhood Probation and Parole Officers.

    Of the $2.25 million, NIJ awarded $1,277,568. The remaining funding will be used by BJA to fund an additional FY 2009 application.

  • Assistance for Tribal Law Enforcement (construction of jails on tribal lands)
    BJA grant funding available: $225 million

    Recovery Act Awards

    Solicitation: Recovery Act: Correctional Facilities on Tribal Lands Program
    Frequently Asked Questions

  • Assistance to Rural Law Enforcement to Combat Crime and Drugs
    BJA grant funding available: $123.775 million

    Recovery Act Awards

    Solicitation: Recovery Act: Assistance to Rural Law Enforcement to Combat Crime and Drugs Program
    Frequently Asked Questions

  • Assistance for Law Enforcement along the Southern Border and in High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA)
    BJA grant funding available: $29.7 million

    Recovery Act Awards

    Solicitation: Recovery Act: State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Program: Combating Criminal Narcotics Activity Stemming from the Southern Border of the United States
    Frequently Asked Questions

  • Grants for Victim Compensation and Assistance - $100 million

    Recovery Act Awards Announced

    Solicitations:
    Recovery Act: OVC FY09 VOCA Victim Compensation Formula Grant Program
    Recovery Act: OVC FY09 VOCA Victim Assistance Formula Grant Program

    State formula allocations

    The Recovery Act provides for $100 million in funding for victim compensation and assistance. Of that $100 million, $47.5 million in formula funding will be directed to state agencies that administer Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) funded crime victim compensation programs, and an additional $47.5 million in formula funding will be directed to state agencies that administer VOCA-funded crime victim assistance programs. OJP’s Office for Victims of Crime will administer this funding and provide detailed guidance to the eligible state agencies on application and reporting requirements in the solicitations that are currently being developed.

    Five million of the $100 million will be directed to discretionary grant projects. The $5 million will be used to make awards under the currently open National Field-Generated Training, Technical Assistance and Demonstration Projects (NFG) competitive grant solicitation. Please be advised that numerous changes will be made to the NFG solicitation. The NFG solicitation deadline has been extended to March 17, 2009.

  • Grants for Internet Crimes Against Children - $50 million

    Recovery Act Awards Announced

    Solicitation: Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program
    Solicitation: Recovery Act: Evaluation of Internet Child Safety Materials Used by ICAC Task Forces in School and Community Settings

    Administered by OJP's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force Program helps state and local law enforcement agencies develop an effective response to cyber enticement and child pornography cases. This help encompasses forensic and investigative components, training and technical assistance, victim services, and community education.

    The ICAC program is a national network of 59 coordinated task forces, representing more than 2,000 federal, state, and local law enforcement and prosecutorial agencies engaged in proactive investigations, forensic examinations, and effective prosecutions. This funding will be used to help state and local law enforcement agencies develop effective, sustainable responses to online child victimization and child pornography. Additional information about how to apply will be announced soon.


The Office of Justice Programs funding listed above is in addition to $1 billion to hire new police officers and $225 million to combat violence against women. For more information about these grant programs, please visit the COPS Office and the Office on Violence Against Women. To learn about the Department of Justice's implementation of the Recovery Act, please visit www.justice.gov/recovery/.

Recovery Act solicitation requirements

OJP encourages all interested and eligible applicants to register now to apply for funding. Potential applicants need to obtain a DUNS (Data Universal Numbering System) number and register with the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) registrant database through www.grants.gov. A DUNS number is a unique number that identifies an organization and helps track the distribution of grant money. The CCR is a central repository of organizations working with the federal government.

For more information about other OJP funding opportunities see the OJP funding page.


Accountability and Transparency


Read the Department of Justice Press Release

Go to OJP's Recovery Act web site

Recovery.gov